Running Shoes: Comfort vs. Function

By Megan Peach, DPT, OCS, CSCS
megan@excelptmt.com

Have you ever stood in front of a wall of running shoes wondering which shoe is right for you? Maybe the Hokas with the super cushioned sole that feel like you’re running on clouds? Or the Brooks trail runners since the trails have cleared up and you’ve been wanting to try out the North Cottonwood trail? Or maybe the Saucony minimalist shoes because you’ve recently read about the benefits of minimalist running? Or my personal favorite, the hot pink shoes with tie-dye laces?! 

You may think that based on the available technology for running shoes and advancements in materials used to create modern running shoes that a plethora of running shoe research would be available. However, this is not necessarily the case.

Although the modern running shoe has been around for the past 40 years since the running boom in the 1970s, research specific to running shoes and injury is relatively new within the past few years. A wide variety of shoe functions exist in running shoes from a cushioned sole for shock absorption, motion control to decrease over pronation, a trail runner, or a minimalist shoe. While some runners may benefit from a specific type of shoes, recent studies on footwear for runners suggest that when shoes or orthotics are selected for comfort rather than function this results in a decreased frequency of running related injury.

So, unfortunately, you can’t base your choice on shoe color alone, but if the pink shoes with tie-dye laces have the best fit and are the most comfortable, they are also the most likely to keep you out of an injury!

Megan Peach, DPT, OCS, CSCS specializes in manual treatment of spinal dysfunction, as well as knee and shoulder pain and is a member of the Excel Physical Therapy running specialist PT team. Megan’s philosophy for physical therapy treatment embraces educating patients about the tools they need for enhancement of proper body movements during work and play to promote a pain and injury free active lifestyle. 

Stress Fractures: From Trail to Icy Sidewalk by Megan Peach, DPT, OCS, CSCS

By Megan Peach, DPT, OCS, CSCS
megan@excelptmt.com

Snow flurries don’t stop most runners from running here in the Gallatin Valley and while running may continue well into cooler temperatures, don’t let a running injury inhibit your ski season! Especially a stress fracture. Up to 10% of runners may suffer from a stress fracture at some point during their running career, and the majority of these injuries are due to training error. Many runners don’t consider a change in terrain a change in training, but a change from trail to icy sidewalk can make a big difference in impact. A stress fracture begins with repetitive stress to the bone such that eventually causes microdamage. (more…)

Excel PT Team to talk at Schnee's Foot Health Seminar, 4/14/2016, 7-8pm

By Megan Peach, DPT, OCS, CSCS
megan@excelptmt.com

Not sure why your feet are hurting? Or which kind of shoe will help? Join us at Schnee’s Boots Shoes & Outdoors, Thursday April 14th from 7-8pm for a Foot Health Seminar. Megan Peach, Chad Yoakam and Jason Lunden of Excel Physical Therapy will be discussing “Foot and Arch Myths and How They Impact Your Movement”. Special Guest, Scott McCoubrey of Scott Footwear. Bring your questions for Q&A after the talk. See you at Schnee’s Montana!

Prevention! See Us Before Your Injury

By Megan Peach, DPT, OCS, CSCS
megan@excelptmt.com

Why wait until after you are injured to see a physical therapist? Did you know that a great time to see a physical therapist is before you are injured? I recently evaluated a patient who wanted to see a physical therapist to learn a home exercise program to prevent future episodes of low back pain. (more…)

Advanced Training News…we’re at it again!

By Megan Peach, DPT, OCS, CSCS
megan@excelptmt.com

Megan Peach, DPT, OCS, CSCS, physical therapist with Excel Physical Therapy of Bozeman and Manhattan, recently completed a three day course titled, “Manual Therapy and Pregnancy: An Integrative Approach” in Portland, Oregon. This course, through the North American Institute of Orthopedic Manual Therapy (NAIOMT), focused on the physical and physiological changes during pregnancy with an objective to gain knowledge and tools for treating the pregnant patient using manual therapy techniques that are safe for both mother and baby. This course also covered up to date exercise guidelines for the pregnant population and tools for the physical therapist to use during pregnancy as well as in the postpartum period to reduce pain and improve function.

Advanced Training News...we're at it again!

By Megan Peach, DPT, OCS, CSCS
megan@excelptmt.com

Megan Peach, DPT, OCS, CSCS, with Excel Physical Therapy of Bozeman and Manhattan, recently completed a North American Institute of Orthopedic Manual Therapy (NAIOMT) advanced training course in Seattle, Washington. This course, taught by Brett Windsor, PT, PhDc, MPA, OCS, FAAOMPT, offered instruction on biomechanical assessment of the lower extremity and rationale for individualized treatment programs. Treatment techniques focused on manual interventions including joint mobilization, manipulation, and soft tissue massage as well as taping techniques and exercise intervention for the knee, foot, and ankle.

Recent Research on Patellofemoral Knee Pain - It's All About the Angle

By Megan Peach, DPT, OCS, CSCS
megan@excelptmt.com

Do you have patellofemoral knee pain? A recent study by Christopher Powers et al. in the Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy suggests that knee angle during quadriceps strengthening exercises affects patellofemoral joint stress. Because excessive joint stress may contribute to patellofemoral pain, the author’s purpose was to determine which exercises were minimally stressful to the knee.

                                                                                                       

During the squat exercise, joint stress was the least in the standing position, and increased as a subject descended into the squat position, peaking at 90 degrees of knee flexion. In an open chain seated leg extension exercise the joint stress was variable depending on the type of weight used, however joint stress was generally greater when the leg was fully extended.

 

The authors suggest that a squat exercise from standing to 45 degrees knee flexion coupled with an open chain seated leg extension from 90 degrees to 45 degrees knee range of motion is the best combination to minimize patellofemoral joint stress and therefore strengthen the quads without increasing pain.

 

We can help you if you suffer from patellofemoral knee pain. Call us at 406-556-0562 (Bozeman) or 406-284-4262 (Manhattan). 

"Awesome job. I called randomly one day and Jason took the call, despite a steady patient load I'm sure."    --N.H., Bozeman patient

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