Climbing Injuries

Free Climbing Injury Screens @ Spire Climbing Center 9/16/2015 6-9pm

By Matt Heyliger, DPT
matt@excelptmt.com

Excel PT Matt Spire Climbing Injury Screens Facebook JpegClimbing unquestionably takes a toll on the body and many if not all climbers end up dealing with some type of injury each season. When our bodies tell us a break from climbing is mandatory, we often make the mistake of not correcting the biomechanical factors that made us vulnerable to injury in the first place. Often times these predisposing factors are easy to correct with proper assessment and the right treatment plan.

Screening includes:

  • A quick evaluation of any climbing-related injuries.
  • Advice on proper management of the injury.
  • Screen for any further medical assessment needs.

Each screening will be approximately 15-20 minutes long so please be prompt.

Sign up online at the following link: www.spireclimbingcenter.com/onlineregistration

Scroll to Events and select the FREE Injury Screening link and fill out the appropriate information.

Matt Heyliger, DPT is a physical therapist with Excel Physical Therapy and an avid rock climber.

 

 

 

 

Rock Hard - Spring Climbing Exercises from "Outside Bozeman"

By Matt Heyliger, DPT
matt@excelptmt.com

Rock Hard – Spring exercises for climbing From Outside Bozeman Magazine

Outside Bozeman Spring 2015

by Matt Heyliger, DPT, Physical Therapist at Excel Physical Therapy in Bozeman, Montana

Click here to access this article on the Outside Bozeman website.

While some of us are still hoping to get in as much spring skiing as possible, the season is changing and the thought of warm days and dry rock is enticing. This is the time of year when climbers realize that winter has taken a toll, and it’s time to grow our forearms again. It’s also when we’re at an increased risk of injury due to de-conditioning. So how can you make this your strongest season yet, red-point last year’s projects, and move on to new objectives? To get started, let’s review some well-documented training concepts, like the “4-3-2-1 concept” developed by Erik Hörst in his book Conditioning for Climbers.

Four weeks of endurance training: rack up as much mileage below your highest on-sight grade as possible. Shoot for three to four days a week of rope climbing on a variety of rock types.

Three weeks of power training. Head to Spire and spend those rainy May days bouldering. Complement this with hang-board training, systems training, or campus training.

Two weeks of anaerobic training. This is maximum-intensity training over short periods of time with equivalent rest time. For example, climb four boulder problems (or roped pitches) consecutively without rest, then rest for the same duration of time. Repeat to fatigue. This will increase your ability to dig deep in situations where rest is not an option.

One week of rest at the end of this 10-week cycle is vital for proper tissue healing and an injury-free season.

Additionally, antagonist training provides muscular balance without adding mass where it’s not useful. We do a lot of pulling in climbing so go push on something—high repetitions of push-ups and shoulder presses are good. Strengthening forearms is important for the stabilization of the elbows and wrists. Try the following exercises:

Wrist Extension
Forearm flat on thigh, hold dumbbell with wrist flexed. Bend wrist up (extend) to feel muscle activation on top of forearm. Lower and repeat.                                            

Pronation
Forearm flat on thigh, secure band with foot tracking band to outside of hand, palm up. Rotate palm downward feeling muscles inside of forearm, slowly return to start. Repeat.

Supination
Forearm flat on thigh, lower slowly toward opposite knee, return to start position feeling burn in extensors in each direction. Repeat.

Radial Deviation
Forearm flat on thigh, lower slowly in casting motion, return to start position feeling burn in top of forearm. Repeat.

Ulnar Deviation
Arm straight at side, weight facing back, perform casting motion back, slowly raising weight to feel burn in back of forearm. Slowly lower and repeat.

Finger Extension
Theraband (or rubber band) around fingers with fingers bent. Straighten fingers and thumb and pull out and up. Hold for five seconds, return to bent finger position and repeat.

Shoulder Stabilization
Shoulder stabilization is also key. Extensive research confirms the benefits of scapular and rotator-cuff stabilization for overhead athletes. In climbing, we spend a lot of time with our hands overhead pulling on holds in awkward postures. Try the pictured exercizes to protect your shoulders and prevent overuse injuries this season.

Core Strengthening
All climbers benefit from core strengthening regardless of ability. Emphasize more static exercizes, like plank and side-plank, as these aare more specific to our sport than crunches.  

Do these exercises three times a week until you are climbing regularly, then cut back to once or twice a week for the remainder of the year to reduce the risk of elbow tendinopathies, wrist injuries, and finger injuries.

While just getting out and climbing is way more fun than training, being able to climb is also way more fun than being injured. “Roctober” is many months away, so tune your machine this spring and have an injury-free season.

Wrist Extensions (wrist flexed)Wrist Extensions (wrist extended)
 
Pronator (forearm flat)Pronator (forearm rotation)
 
Supinator (forearm flat)Supinator (forearm rotated) Radial Deviation (forearm flat)Radial Deviation (forearm rotated)
 
 
Ulnar Deviation (arm at side)Ulnar Deviation (raised)
 
Finger Extension (bent)Finger Extension (straight)
Shoulder Stabilization (start)Shoulder Stabilization (finish)
 

Matt Heyliger, DPT is a physical therapist at Excel Physical Therapy. Please call the Bozeman office with any questions at 406-556-0562.

The information in this article is intended for informational and educational purposes only and in no way should be taken to be the provision or practice of physical therapy, medical, or professional healthcare advice or services. The information should not be considered complete or exhaustive and should not be used for diagnostic or treatment purposes without first consulting with your physical therapist, occupational therapist, physician or other healthcare provider. The owners of this website accept no responsibility for the misuse of information contained within this website

Common Rock Climbing Injuries Talk | September 10, 2014 6:30pm

By Matt Heyliger, DPT
matt@excelptmt.com

Excel Physical Therapy Community Education Series | Free & Open to the Public

“Common Rock Climbing Injuries: Prevention & Treatment”

presented by Matt Heyliger, DPT

Wednesday, September 10, 2014 | 6:30-7:30pm

Bozeman Public Library Community Room

  • Learn how to identify and self-treat the most common shoulder, elbow and finger injuries related to climbing.

  • Discover when it’s time to rest an injury and when it is safe to return to climbing after an injury.

  • Discussion of preventative exercises to protect against common climbing injuries.

  • Discussion of safe training techniques to reduce your risk of overuse/overtraining injuries.

  • Q&A with Matt Heliger, DPT after the talk.

 

Matt Heyliger, DPT has been an avid climber for the past 12 years and his passion for climbing has taken him around the US, Canada and Mexico. He enjoys all forms of climbing (trad, sport and bouldering) and loves the variation in movement and style inspired by different types of rock. Matt has developed a specific interest focus in biomechanics and how impairments at one level or joint affect other body structures. More specifically, he has a particular interest in the relationship of cervical/thoracic spine mechanics and upper extremity conditions.  Matt practices in both the Excel Physical Therapy offices in Bozeman and Manhattan.

"Jackie and everyone else at Excel PT are excellent. They are professional, understanding and provide a lot of encouragement to 'keep at it'."--D.E., Bozeman client

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