Posture Matters! Seminar 10/5/2016 @ Bozeman Library

By David Coletta, MPT, CMPT
david@excelptmt.com

Community Education Series   |   Free & Open to the Public

Posture Matters! Seminarpoor posture at work

Wednesday, October 5, 2016

6:30-8:00pm

Bozeman Public Library

Large Community Room

seating limited to first 100 attendees

Presented by David Coletta, MPT, CMPT

 

What You Will Learn:

  • Learn why your posture matters, how it can lead to health concerns, and what you can do to improve yours now.
  • Please bring your older kids! Learning to optimize posture at an early age can have life changing results.
  • With the popularity of personal electronic devices, poor posture is an increasing problem. People of all ages are at risk for developing a multitude of musculoskeletal problems, including neck pain, back pain, headaches, shoulder impingement, elbow tendonitis, thoracic outlet syndrome, TMD, etc.
  • Bring your questions! Q&A with David Coletta, MPT, CMPT during and after the talk.

 

David Coletta, MPT, CMPT specializes in the treatment of back and neck pain, spinal issues, whiplash, headaches, TMJ/jaw pain, postural dysfunctions and professional bike fitting. As the founding owner of Excel Physical Therapy, David established Excel PT in 2001 on the principles of specialization, advanced education and customer service. He enjoys finding long-term solutions for his patients — solutions that involve a fine-tuned combination of manual manipulative therapy and a targeted exercise program that address even the most difficult patient presentations.

 

"Got to Keep on Moving" by Matt Heyliger, DPT

By Matt Heyliger, DPT
matt@excelptmt.com

I have recently been thinking quite a bit about the importance of joint mobility, not strictly for function, but for joint health. In manual therapy, assessment of a given joint in the body always consists of consideration of joint mobility. Is there enough mobility? If not, why not? Does the joint itself have a motion restriction? Or is there perhaps some tissue outside the joint, like a tight muscle, that is limiting mobility? While it makes sense that a certain degree of motion is important for functional tasks, like bending your knee a certain amount to ascend stairs, mobility is also critical for joint health. (more…)

Free Climbing Injury Screens @ Spire Climbing Center 9/16/2015 6-9pm

By Matt Heyliger, DPT
matt@excelptmt.com

Excel PT Matt Spire Climbing Injury Screens Facebook JpegClimbing unquestionably takes a toll on the body and many if not all climbers end up dealing with some type of injury each season. When our bodies tell us a break from climbing is mandatory, we often make the mistake of not correcting the biomechanical factors that made us vulnerable to injury in the first place. Often times these predisposing factors are easy to correct with proper assessment and the right treatment plan.

Screening includes:

  • A quick evaluation of any climbing-related injuries.
  • Advice on proper management of the injury.
  • Screen for any further medical assessment needs.

Each screening will be approximately 15-20 minutes long so please be prompt.

Sign up online at the following link: www.spireclimbingcenter.com/onlineregistration

Scroll to Events and select the FREE Injury Screening link and fill out the appropriate information.

Matt Heyliger, DPT is a physical therapist with Excel Physical Therapy and an avid rock climber.

 

 

 

 

Advanced Training News...We're at it again!

By David Coletta, MPT, CMPT
david@excelptmt.com

David Coletta, MPT, CMPT, physical therapist and owner of Excel Physical Therapy of Bozeman and Manhattan, recently completed a seven day advanced spinal manipulation training from the North American Institute of Orthopedic Manual Therapy (NAIOMT). The course was held at Andrews University in Berrien Springs, Michigan, and was taught by Erl Pettman, PT, MCSP, MCPA, FCAMPT, a world leader in the development and education of safe and effective spinal manipulation.

  • At Excel PT of Bozeman and Manhattan, we are dedicated to providing our patients with the highest level of physical therapy treatment. Our physical therapists focus on evidenced-based practice, rigorous continued education in specialized areas of treatment, and weekly research-based study to allow our patients to quickly and effectively achieve the best results. To further ensure preeminent physical therapy services and patient care, each of our patients are directly treated by our licensed, specialty certified physical therapists – without interaction from assistants or aides.

Common Rock Climbing Injuries Talk | September 10, 2014 6:30pm

By Matt Heyliger, DPT
matt@excelptmt.com

Excel Physical Therapy Community Education Series | Free & Open to the Public

“Common Rock Climbing Injuries: Prevention & Treatment”

presented by Matt Heyliger, DPT

Wednesday, September 10, 2014 | 6:30-7:30pm

Bozeman Public Library Community Room

  • Learn how to identify and self-treat the most common shoulder, elbow and finger injuries related to climbing.

  • Discover when it’s time to rest an injury and when it is safe to return to climbing after an injury.

  • Discussion of preventative exercises to protect against common climbing injuries.

  • Discussion of safe training techniques to reduce your risk of overuse/overtraining injuries.

  • Q&A with Matt Heliger, DPT after the talk.

 

Matt Heyliger, DPT has been an avid climber for the past 12 years and his passion for climbing has taken him around the US, Canada and Mexico. He enjoys all forms of climbing (trad, sport and bouldering) and loves the variation in movement and style inspired by different types of rock. Matt has developed a specific interest focus in biomechanics and how impairments at one level or joint affect other body structures. More specifically, he has a particular interest in the relationship of cervical/thoracic spine mechanics and upper extremity conditions.  Matt practices in both the Excel Physical Therapy offices in Bozeman and Manhattan.

Excel PT offering Free Bike Fitting Screenings at GVLT Longest Day of Trails 3-6pm

By Tiffany Coletta
tiffany@excelptmt.com

Friday, June 20, 2014

Montana Ale Works from 3-6pm

2014-LDOT-Poster-FINAL

David Coletta, MPT, CMPT and Jason Lunden, DPT, SCS of Excel Physical Therapy will be providing free Bike Fitting Screenings at the Longest Day of Trails Headquarters in Bozeman, Montana. Come by with your bike to learn how David and Jason can help fit your bike to your body. Reduce pain while riding as well as increase your cycling performance. Free Specialized water bottle with every free Excel PT Bike Fitting Screen!

Click Here for Excel Physical Therapy Professional Bike Fitting information.
 

This GVLT annual dawn-to-dusk (6am–10pm) bike-a-thon and membership drive takes places on the Friday in June nearest the Summer Solstice. It highlights GVLT’s work to expand, improve, and maintain our community trails. Headquartered at Montana Ale Works, the event features bike rides for all ages and abilities on Bozeman’s Main Street to the Mountains trails, with an evening celebration at Montana Ale Works and live music from Jawbone Railroad.

For a $35 donation to GVLT you receive a $5 gift certificate from Montana Ale Works and a wrist band to participate in the cycling activities. For a donation of $50 or more you will also receive a $5 gift certificate to Montana Ale Works, a wristband to participate in the cycling activities AND a gift certificate to a local retailer.

Click Here for more Longest Day of Trails event details and information.

Proper Computer Ergonomics for a Healthy Neck & Back

By David Coletta, MPT, CMPT
david@excelptmt.com

Proper Computer Ergonomics for a Healthy Neck & Back

Using computers have become a normal part of most people’s daily lives.  For many of us, sitting at a desk top or laptop computer can last several hours every day.  Do you suffer from neck pain, upper back pain, or headaches?  Could poor posture at the computer be a contributing factor to such complaints? A 2012 study (Cho et al) found that 254 surveyed Chinese office workers, between 25 and 40 years old, working 3+ hours per day at the computer, had a 71%-76% prevalence of neck pain and a 60%-64% prevalence of upper back pain.       

 How often do we find ourselves stuck in postures such as this?  Poor positioning, most often producing a forward head, causes undue stress on the neck and upper back muscles and joints.  Over time, the soft tissues cannot bear the burden without developing tightness and inflammation.  Such complaints lead to pain and a visit to the physical therapist, massage therapist, or doctor in search of relief.

 A proper desktop set-up starts with a higher quality supportive computer chair, which securely supports the lower back lordosis, has great deal of adjustability, and comes with padded arm rests (forearm rests on padding).  A large computer screen, with the top edge placed just above eye level, is optimal.  The keyboard and mouse should be easily accessible to the hands so that the elbow can rest under the shoulder.  The ultimate goal is to have the ear, shoulder, elbow, and hip almost in a perfect vertical line.

 Posture Photo 2 3-28-2014If the top of your desk is too high, then your keyboard and mouse can be placed on an adjustable external tray that is secured underneath this surface.  Obtaining proper ergonomics can be a good deal more challenging with a laptop computer, but purchasing an external keyboard and mouse or a laptop stand can be helpful.  These and other computer ergonomic products can be found online at ergopro.com

 

If you have specific questions about how to improve your computer ergonomics, contact David Coletta, MPT, CMPT at Excel Physical Therapy, 406-556-0562 in #Bozeman, Montana.

David Coletta's Personal Bout with Acute Neck Pain: The Onset Part 1

By David Coletta, MPT, CMPT
david@excelptmt.com

My Personal Bout with Acute Neck Pain: The Onset ~ Part 1 of 3

The Onset

Evaluating and treating individuals with neck pain has been my specialty over the past 15 years.  I have literally treated over a thousand people suffering from this affliction.  Recently, neck pain became a much more personal issue, as I experienced the sort of agony which some of my patients deal with.  For the past 20 years, my neck has been intermittently stiff, with the occasional inability to turn my head for a day or two and what felt like an acute muscle spam, but there has been nothing of serious concern.  This was different.  While still in bed, I opened my eyes in the morning and noticed neck stiffness when turning over.  Could this be one of those mornings where there would be trouble turning my head?  Better to get up slowly.  I sat up and immediately felt a rush of nauseating pain sweeping into my low neck and then shooting into my left shoulder blade.  I don’t have time for this I thought.  Into the shower for some hot water on the neck and down the hatch with 600mg of Ibuprofen.  I drove to work applying traction to my neck with both hands and steering with my elbows and knees.  A smarter man would have just stayed at home and called in sick.  But I had patients that depended on me.

Luckily, this was my short day of the week at work.  My neck pain steadily grew worse and by 2PM I was stuck with my head down and turned to the right, avoiding the worst ache.  I utilized a home traction unit from work and had to go very slowly and gently not to aggravate my symptoms.  That night, I managed about 2 hours of sleep, constantly readjusting to avoid pain.

The next morning, I called a physician friend of mine and he prescribed me a round of oral steroids.   After 3 days, my neck pain slowly started to improve and within 1 week I was 75% better and training on my road bike for short periods.  Unfortunately, this progress did not last.

8 days after the initial onset, my symptoms suddenly returned in the morning and were even worse.  At this point I had to be honest with myself about the serious nature of my neck problem.  My symptoms included weakness in the left arm, severe pain behind the left shoulder and into the shoulder blade, severe neck pain, numbness in the left hand, and I could not extend my neck or turn to the right.  This was a very familiar presentation, a cervical radiculopathy.  It had to be a disc bulge in my low neck that was inflaming and compressing one of the spinal nerves.  Megan Peach, DPT, here at Excel PT did a great job at treating my acute problem, but my presentation was too severe to benefit from PT at that time.  I decided to make an appointment with a local orthopedic specialty physician. 

Click Here to read My Personal Bout with Acute Neck Pain: Recovery ~ Part 2 of 3

Click Here to read My Personal Bout with Acute Neck Pain: Lessons Learned ~ Part 3 of 3

 

David Coletta's Personal Bout with Acute Neck Pain: Recovery Part 2

By David Coletta, MPT, CMPT
david@excelptmt.com

My Personal Bout with Acute Neck Pain: Recovery ~ Part 2 of 3

Recovery

As a physical therapist specializing in treatment of the spine, I had a great deal of experience with the physicians at Bridger Orthopedic & Sports Medicine.  This seemed like a good place to seek advice and help for my agonizing condition.   I called Christine, a patient care coordinator at Bridger, and she was kind enough to get a same day appointment for me with Dr. Speth and Bryce Wiley, PA-C.  They performed a very thorough evaluation and determined that I most likely had a cervical radiculopathy.  I was in for a cervical MRI the next day and Bryce called to inform me that the imaging revealed a left C5/C6 disc bulge with compression on the C6 nerve root.  There was also some cervical arthritis present in the mid to low neck.

Again, the patient care coordinators (Christine & Shane) quickly scheduled me for a cervical steroid injection with Dr. Slocum at the surgery center, just below Bridger Orthopedics & Sports Medicine.  Dr. Slocum was kind enough to come downstairs between seeing patients and perform a transforaminal steroid injection in the neck.  During the procedure, I took the opportunity to dissect what was going on.  Some of my patients go through spinal injections and they will often ask me if it is painful.  Now I was about to find out.  I’m sure the experience is different for all people, but my procedural pain was considerable, though quite brief.  Dr. Slocum injected around C6 on the left and for about 5 to 6 seconds I felt all of the pain that I had experienced over the last week and a half condensed into my neck, shoulder blade, and arm.  Within a few minutes there was some relief.  Dr. Slocum explained that the injection could take 1 to 2 weeks for the full positive effect, but I would experience an initial decrease in pain within the first day, which might not last.

The next morning I woke up and felt 90% better.  I could move my neck, lie down comfortably on my back, and work on patients without concentrating on my own pain.  Slowly, by the next day this reduction in pain slid backwards to about 50% better.  I had a problem.  Two days later, I was to be on a flight to Chicago for a much anticipated PT continuing education course.  Bryce prescribed me another round of oral steroids and more hydrocodone for pain relief.  I made it to Chicago, wearing a soft cervical collar on the airplane to support my neck. 

I arrived at my continuing education course tired, now only 40% better, and unable to sit during the presentation.  I was truly blessed to be traveling with Jason Lunden, one of our sports specialist PTs from Excel PT, and sitting next to another experienced PT named Effie.  During the first break she looked at me and asked if I was OK.  She got the full story.  Effie said “I can help you.”  I immediately explained how serious this problem was and that I probably was not appropriate for hands-on PT treatment.  She assured me that her specialty was in spine.  Sounds familiar.  Effie performed left sided cervical and upper thoracic joint mobilizations, soft tissue techniques to the shoulder blade and shoulder muscles, and traction to the neck.  These techniques were more aggressive than I would have chosen for my patients, but I was willing to try anything and I trusted her.  After 10 minutes of treatment, my pain was reduced greatly and I practically fell asleep on the table.

Effie treated my neck again on the following 2 days of class and, by the time I returned home to Bozeman, the symptoms were improved to 75% of normal.  I continued under the care of Megan Peach, at Excel PT, and I reached 95% improvement over the next month with physical therapy treatments 2x/weeks.  The remaining 5% of symptom reduction and full strength in the left arm took 2 to 3 more months of performing my exercises independently.  

Click Here to read David’s Personal Bout with Acute Neck Pain: Lessons Learned ~ Part 3 of 3

Click Here to read David’s Personal Bout with Acute Neck Pain: The Onset ~ Part 1 of 3

"When I first came to Excel PT, my lower back pain was keeping me from my normal activities. My physical therapist listened to my symptoms, came up with a cause for the pain and a plan to correct the problem. After a few months of exercise, I'm now able to fish and work in my shop all day. No surgery now!"--R.G., Bozeman patient

View more testimonials from Excel PT clients »