Posture

Posture Matters! Seminar 10/5/2016 @ Bozeman Library

By David Coletta, MPT, CMPT
david@excelptmt.com

Community Education Series   |   Free & Open to the Public

Posture Matters! Seminarpoor posture at work

Wednesday, October 5, 2016

6:30-8:00pm

Bozeman Public Library

Large Community Room

seating limited to first 100 attendees

Presented by David Coletta, MPT, CMPT

 

What You Will Learn:

  • Learn why your posture matters, how it can lead to health concerns, and what you can do to improve yours now.
  • Please bring your older kids! Learning to optimize posture at an early age can have life changing results.
  • With the popularity of personal electronic devices, poor posture is an increasing problem. People of all ages are at risk for developing a multitude of musculoskeletal problems, including neck pain, back pain, headaches, shoulder impingement, elbow tendonitis, thoracic outlet syndrome, TMD, etc.
  • Bring your questions! Q&A with David Coletta, MPT, CMPT during and after the talk.

 

David Coletta, MPT, CMPT specializes in the treatment of back and neck pain, spinal issues, whiplash, headaches, TMJ/jaw pain, postural dysfunctions and professional bike fitting. As the founding owner of Excel Physical Therapy, David established Excel PT in 2001 on the principles of specialization, advanced education and customer service. He enjoys finding long-term solutions for his patients — solutions that involve a fine-tuned combination of manual manipulative therapy and a targeted exercise program that address even the most difficult patient presentations.

 

Proper Computer Ergonomics for a Healthy Neck & Back

By David Coletta, MPT, CMPT
david@excelptmt.com

Proper Computer Ergonomics for a Healthy Neck & Back

Using computers have become a normal part of most people’s daily lives.  For many of us, sitting at a desk top or laptop computer can last several hours every day.  Do you suffer from neck pain, upper back pain, or headaches?  Could poor posture at the computer be a contributing factor to such complaints? A 2012 study (Cho et al) found that 254 surveyed Chinese office workers, between 25 and 40 years old, working 3+ hours per day at the computer, had a 71%-76% prevalence of neck pain and a 60%-64% prevalence of upper back pain.       

 How often do we find ourselves stuck in postures such as this?  Poor positioning, most often producing a forward head, causes undue stress on the neck and upper back muscles and joints.  Over time, the soft tissues cannot bear the burden without developing tightness and inflammation.  Such complaints lead to pain and a visit to the physical therapist, massage therapist, or doctor in search of relief.

 A proper desktop set-up starts with a higher quality supportive computer chair, which securely supports the lower back lordosis, has great deal of adjustability, and comes with padded arm rests (forearm rests on padding).  A large computer screen, with the top edge placed just above eye level, is optimal.  The keyboard and mouse should be easily accessible to the hands so that the elbow can rest under the shoulder.  The ultimate goal is to have the ear, shoulder, elbow, and hip almost in a perfect vertical line.

 Posture Photo 2 3-28-2014If the top of your desk is too high, then your keyboard and mouse can be placed on an adjustable external tray that is secured underneath this surface.  Obtaining proper ergonomics can be a good deal more challenging with a laptop computer, but purchasing an external keyboard and mouse or a laptop stand can be helpful.  These and other computer ergonomic products can be found online at ergopro.com

 

If you have specific questions about how to improve your computer ergonomics, contact David Coletta, MPT, CMPT at Excel Physical Therapy, 406-556-0562 in #Bozeman, Montana.

Posture: “Sit Up Straight, Don’t Slouch!”

By Tiffany Coletta
tiffany@excelptmt.com

Posture: “Sit Up Straight, Don’t Slouch!”

“Sit up straight, don’t slouch!” Those words echo in my head close to the spot where I can almost feel the slap on the back of my head from my mother’s hand as she reminded me to sit up straight at the dinner table.

As a physical therapist, I can now appreciate the benefits of maintaining appropriate posture. Almost daily, I see patients with neck, back or shoulder pain. The majority of these patients have noticeably bad posture. We all do. It’s a constant battle between aging, our bodies and gravity. We must work to maintain appropriate posture or our bodies “slouch” into the easiest position, succumbing to the force of gravity and our office chair.  

From a mechanical standpoint it all makes clear sense. Keep in mind, that it is scientific fact, that our entire body is related. One system affects the other.  If our shoulders are “slouched” forward as we sit at our office desk, our neck must then extend to compensate so that we can continue to view the computer or look forward. The vicious cycle continues to take its toll. The muscles across our chest get short and tight, adapting to this poor posture. In return, the muscles between our shoulder blades and on our back become elongated and weak, further adding to the problem. This affects the mechanics of our shoulders. It also alters the mechanics of our middle and low back.

Simply put, poor posture places additional stress on your spine and the muscles, ligaments, and other soft tissue surrounding it. There is a solution however! Sit up straight. Here are few recommendations to sit properly and some simple exercises you can do on your own to address your posture.

 

1)      You may have to alter your work station to make it more posture and ergonomically friendly.

2)      Try a towel roll for lumbar support

  • Make a towel roll with a (6-8) inch diameter
  • Place behind low back
  • Sit up with shoulder blades down and in your back pockets

3)      Stretch the muscle across the front of your chest.

                  

4)      Strengthen the muscles across your back.

      

 

Make all of these simple exercises a habit!

 

A statesman who keeps his ear permanently glued to the ground will have neither elegance of posture nor flexibility of movement.   Abba Eban

 

Adam Groves, DPT specializes in the treatment of back pain, neck pain, whiplash, general orthopedic conditions, and vestibular or balance disorders. He received his doctorate of Physical Therapy degree from the University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences in St. Augustine, Florida. Training under the instruction of Dr. Stanley Paris at St. Augustine’s highly regarded manual therapy program, Adam developed his specialized, comprehensive treatment approach.

Prior to completing his doctoral education, Adam received his Bachelors of Science in Education, with a major in Exercise Science from the University of Tennessee. There he worked as a student athletic trainer with men’s athletics, and focused on physical wellness, conditioning and athletic performance.

 

"After my Achilles tendon rupture and repair I came to Excel PT. Because of the type of injury I had with the Achilles I was nervous but both Megan and Jason made me feel comfortable and did an excellent job with my therapy. They were very professional and personable which made for an overall great experience. Thanks guys!" --Manhattan Patient

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