How to Build Muscle Faster: Blood Flow Restriction Therapy

By Jason Lunden, DPT, SCS
jason@excelptmt.com

Blood flow restriction training (BFR) is a relatively new technique being used in physical therapy and gyms to increase muscle strength.  We have been using BFR therapy at Excel Physical Therapy with promising results.   BFR therapy utilizes compressive forces from a specialized blood pressure cuff to restrict venous blood flow from a muscle group while allowing for continued arterial blood flow to the muscle.   The result of the restricted venous blood flow is a state of ischemia to the exercising muscle.  Exercising in a state of ischemia seems to cause a physiological cascade that results in increased signaling that promotes muscle growth, even at lower loads on the muscle. 

Utilizing BFR under careful supervision of a physical therapist, allows one to prevent muscle atrophy and increase muscular growth and strength while recovering from injury or surgery.   BFR is not a panacea and therefore is just one component of a proper rehabilitation program.  The ability of BFR to stimulate muscle growth at lower loads of resistance make it a perfect modality to consider for the earlier stages of rehabilitation.   To learn more about BFR therapy and to see if it would be appropriate for you, be sure to ask your physical therapist here at Excel Physical Therapy

 

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Jason Lunden, DPT, SCS specializes in the rehabilitation and prevention of sports-related injuries, with a particular interest in the biomechanics of sporting activities – running, cycling, skiing, snowboarding and overhead athletics. Jason serves as a physical therapist for the US Snowboarding and US Freeskiing teams, along with the US Paralympic Nordic Ski Team, and is a local and national presenter on sports rehabilitation and injury prevention topics. Jason is a Certified Clinical BikeFit Pro Fitter.

Jason Lunden, DPT, SCS attends US Ski & Snowboard Class at the USSA Center of Excellence

By Jason Lunden, DPT, SCS
jason@excelptmt.com

Jason Lunden, DPT, SCS, of Excel Physical Therapy, recently attended the US Ski & Snowboard Team Medical Emergencies in Skiing and Snowboarding (MESS) Course at the USSA Center of Excellence in Park City, UT. The course focused on concussion evaluation, management and rehabilitation, as well as athlete development for ski and snowboard athletes.   Jason is an owner and physical therapist with Excel Physical Therapy of Bozeman and Manhattan, and he volunteers as a physical therapist for the US Ski & Snowboard Teams.

Hip to be Cool: Preventing Running Injuries - Outside Bozeman Magazine

By Jason Lunden, DPT, SCS
jason@excelptmt.com

“Hip to be Cool – Preventing Running Injuries” article from Outside Bozeman Magazine

by Jason Lunden, DPT, SCS

Join Jason Lunden, DPT, SCS and Megan Peach, DPT, OCS, CSCS at our Running Experts Forum event on 3/29/2017, 6:30pm at the Bozeman Library for a lively discussion of ALL things running. Our Physical Therapists who specialize in Running Injury Treatment and Running Evaluations along with several Bozeman running expert special guests will discuss various running related topics and answer audience questions. Bring your questions or email them in advance to megan@excelptmt.com!

Injury Prevention in Nordic Skiing: Elbow & Shoulder Pain

By Jason Lunden, DPT, SCS
jason@excelptmt.com

Due to the repetitive stress from poling, Nordic skiers can develop overuse injuries of both the elbow and/or the shoulder. The most common of these are medial epicondylitis and shoulder impingement syndrome.   The underlying cause of the development of these injuries is multi-factorial: poling technique, pole length, and poor strength and conditioning.  

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Injury Prevention in Nordic Skiing: Knee Pain

By Jason Lunden, DPT, SCS
jason@excelptmt.com

Patellofemoral pain, or anterior knee pain, is the most common type of knee pain in Nordic skiing.   Repetitive stress to the soft tissue around the patella (knee cap) occurs due to poor tracking of the patella in the femoral groove.  This poor tracking can be the result of hip weakness causing poor control of movement of the femur (thigh bone), poor stabilization from the foot and ankle, and poor skiing technique.

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Injury Prevention in Nordic Skiing: Technique

By Jason Lunden, DPT, SCS
jason@excelptmt.com

Often I think Nordic (cross-country) skiing is the perfect sport for fitness.  Nordic skiing is a great workout and way to enjoy the outdoors in winter.  Plus, it has a very low injury rate.  In fact compared to alpine skiing and snowboarding, Nordic skiing has 20X fewer severe injuries and 5X fewer injuries overall.1

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Technique & the Prevention of Alpine Ski Injuries: Part 4

By Jason Lunden, DPT, SCS
jason@excelptmt.com

Nearly all injuries in alpine skiing are classified as traumatic, or due to a fall.  As mentioned earlier, under Strength & Injury Prevention, the majority of knee injuries in alpine skiing occur on the left knee.   Therefore it is important to work on your ski technique to be able to turn equally well to your right and left.  With the snowpack being shallower and conditions not yet epic, the early season is a great time to work on perfecting your turns.  Aim to stay balanced on your skis with your hips centered and perfect your turns to both sides.  A Professional Ski Instructor or coach can make all the difference, so take the time to perfect your technique by taking a lesson at one or our local ski resorts, or sign-up for coaching from a community ski team such as the Bridger Ski Foundation (BSF).

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"Walked in a skeptic, walked out better than 100%! Thanks Matt!" -- M.M., Bozeman client

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