“Understanding Climbing Injuries" Talk @ MSU Climbing Gym 1/29/2019

By Matt Heyliger, DPT
matt@excelptmt.com

Community Education Series | Free

 “Understanding Climbing Injuries: The Biomechanics Behind Acute and Overuse Injuries in Climbing”

presented by Matt Heyliger, DPT

Tuesday, January 29, 2019 | 12pm-1:30pm

Montana State University Climbing Gym in the Hosaeus Fitness Center

  • Learn about the most common contributing factors to both acute and overuse injuries in rock climbing.
  • Deepen your understanding of upper extremity anatomy and biomechanics.
  • Learn self-care techniques that are critical to injury prevention and treatment.
  • Learn how to safely re-introduce climbing after injury/rehabilitation.
  • Discuss approaches to training for climbing including safe use of a hang board and campus board. 
  • Have questions? Q&A with Matt Heyliger, DPT after the talk.

Matt Heyliger, DPT is an avid climber and mountain sports enthusiast.  His passion for climbing has taken him around the US, Canada and Mexico. Matt has a specific interest focus in biomechanics and how impairments at one level or joint affect other body structures. Matt has specialized in working with and treating rock climbers for more than 5 years. In the past year he has been able to broaden his approach to treating climbers through integrating video analysis and specialized biomechanical assessments in the Climbing Lab at Excel Physical Therapy. 

Noisy Necks

By Matt Heyliger, DPT
matt@excelptmt.com

I am frequently asked about whether it is normal for a neck to make a lot of noise. Some of the more common adjectives I hear from patients describing these sensations are creaking, grinding or crinkly noises…the kind of noises you hear on the inside but are not generally audible to others. The short answer is yes, some increase in neck noise is to be expected as we age. However, certain noisy necks deserve a bit more attention. 

To clarify, the noisy necks described above should be distinguished from other common neck noises including popping, cracking, clicking or snapping sensations in the neck. The importance in this distinction is that the former is most likely associated with normal wear and tear as long as there is not pain associated with the noise, where the latter may indicate some problems brewing in your noisy neck. Necks that tend to pop a lot, especially those that need to pop to relieve tension or pain, are likely experiencing increased stress in the joints and/or disc at the level of the popping. This should be seen as a warning sign. For the owner of that noisy neck, there is likely some degree of asymmetry in the mobility of the joints in the neck. This can lead to degeneration of those segments of the cervical spine that may lead to more problems than just neck noise down the line. 

If your noisy neck is associated with pain and/or ever increasing stiffness and loss of mobility then you should consider consulting with your Physical Therapist. While some loss of motion in you neck is common with aging, especially in your later 60’s and beyond, earlier onset of a significant loss in mobility could be a tipping point for your neck. Many folks who bring this up during a physical therapy appointment are relieved to learn that certain neck noise is normal. In situations where neck noise may be indicative of a neck that’s going south, taking action and making a plan may really make a difference in your quality of life a few years around the bend.

 

 

Matt Heyliger, DPT of Excel Physical Therapy completed his Doctorate in Physical Therapy at Eastern Washington University in Cheney, Washington. He has a particular treatment focus in the relationship of cervical/thoracic spine mechanics and upper extremity conditions. An avid rock climber, telemark/backcountry skier and mountain biker, Matt regularly practices yoga and enjoys frequent adventures in the mountains with his family and their two labs.

Advanced Training...we're at it again! Matt Heyliger, DPT completes lower extremity course in Seattle

By Matt Heyliger, DPT
matt@excelptmt.com

Matt Heyliger, DPT, physical therapist with Excel Physical Therapy of Bozeman and Manhattan, recently completed the North American Institute of Orthopedic Manual Therapy (NAIOMT) Level II course held in Seattle, WA with a focus on assessment and treatment of lower extremity conditions. The course emphasized assessment of the foot and ankle addressing correlations with foot and ankle biomechanics and overall lower extremity function. Many mobilization and manipulation treatment techniques were presented for the foot, ankle, and knee. Matt has now completed all Level I, II and III courses through NAIOMT, the equivalent of 231 hours of hands-on continuing education coursework in manual therapy.

Advanced Training...We're at it again!

By Matt Heyliger, DPT
matt@excelptmt.com

Matt Heyliger, physical therapist with Excel Physical Therapy of Bozeman and Manhattan, recently completed a Level III Advanced Lower Quadrant Integration course with an emphasis on integrating biomechanical assessment of the lumbosacral region, hip, knee, foot and ankle. The course follows the respected North American Institute for Orthopedic Manual Therapy (NAIOMT) program for advanced certification training. Key concepts studied during this four-day intensive course, held in Seattle, included advanced clinical reasoning and assessment approaches and integrated manual therapy and join manipulation approaches for complex biomechanical presentations.

http://www.bozemandailychronicle.com/business/people/people-in-business-for-sunday-november/article_9037a164-59dd-58ac-9dd1-ca773d1927e6.html

"Got to Keep on Moving" by Matt Heyliger, DPT

By Matt Heyliger, DPT
matt@excelptmt.com

I have recently been thinking quite a bit about the importance of joint mobility, not strictly for function, but for joint health. In manual therapy, assessment of a given joint in the body always consists of consideration of joint mobility. Is there enough mobility? If not, why not? Does the joint itself have a motion restriction? Or is there perhaps some tissue outside the joint, like a tight muscle, that is limiting mobility? While it makes sense that a certain degree of motion is important for functional tasks, like bending your knee a certain amount to ascend stairs, mobility is also critical for joint health. (more…)

Advanced Training News…we’re at it again!

By Matt Heyliger, DPT
matt@excelptmt.com

Matt Heyliger, DPT, physical therapist with Excel Physical Therapy of Bozeman and Manhattan, recently completed part two of the Level III “Upper Quarter Integration” course with the North American Institute of Orthopedic Manual Therapy (NAIOMT) held in Phoenix, Arizona. This course emphasized assessment and advanced manual therapy treatment techniques for shoulder and upper extremity dysfunction originating from cervical and/or thoracic spine dysfunction.

"Matt Schumacher and the entire staff are superb. Matt's combination of exercise, therapeutic manipulations, advice, and support have helped me to enjoy 95 to 100% improvement in my spinal stenosis symptoms. Thank you Matt. Thank you all." -- R.W., Bozeman Client

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