Preventing Falls & Improving Balance Talk with Jackie Oliver, DPT, OCS

By Jackie Oliver, DPT
jackie@excelptmt.com

 

Preventing Falls & Improving Balance Talk

Presented by Jackie Oliver, DPT, OCS, on Zoom

Community Virtual Event – Free & open to the public

Zoom recording link: http://bit.ly/3qCZjwW

Learn how to assess & reduce your risk of falling and how to improve your balance with the latest evidence-based techniques.
 
  • Understand how physical therapy can reduce your risk of falling.
  • Learn how to improve your balance with at-home techniques and addressing modifiable risk factors.
  • Increase knowledge about what factors contribute to balance issues and how to intervene.
  • Recognize the health risks and injuries associated with older adult falls.
  • Falls can be prevented!
 
Jackie’s Preventing Falls & Improving Balance Talk Facebook Event Page 

 

Q&A transcript from the talk:
 

Q:  I fell yesterday walking and I have fallen a lot. All I can think of is, I am not picking up my feet enough? When I hit a crack or something I hit my toe and fall forward.   

A:  Sometimes that can be a strength thing, maybe your body is not strong enough, not that you can’t do it, but as you fatigue when you’re walking, you’re not lifting your feet as high because you are getting tired. So, your endurance might not be there in the lower extremity. It can be a multitude of factors…it could be your proprioception in the bottom of your feet aren’t picking up the cracks. A physical therapy evaluation can assess exactly what is causing your balance issues. As we get older, we tend to have balance issues that happen a little easier. We definitely don’t want you falling, especially outside on the hard concrete, that’s not a great place to be falling.  Definitely worth a mention to your doctor or physical therapist about what you are experiencing so a plan can be put into place to help address this issue for you.

 

Q:  I am someone who is dealing with peripheral neuropathy in my legs and feet, what do I do? Also, I am not able to lift my feet high enough when walking due to peripheral neuropathy. 

A:  So what you will want to do is uptrain like we talked about in that pie chart.  We talked about a third, a third, and a third for vision, vestibular and peripheral neuropathy.  The pie chart section that focuses on peripheral neuropathy is closing because you don’t have the sensation in your feet anymore. So you have to uptrain those other systems in order to compensate for the proprioception loss. Yes, it’s absolutely trainable.  Not being able to lift your feet high enough is a strength thing, with peripheral neuropathy, you’re not going to change the peripheral neuropathy, you’re going to uptrain those other systems. It’s like a muscle making those other systems stronger, so you aren’t worried about the peripheral neuropathy impact as much.    

 

Q:  Is there somewhere we can access the charts that you were talking about? 

A: The whole presentation will be loaded onto the Facebook page and the Excel website with the slides.  (coming soon)

 

Q:  What would you recommend as a call assist company for around your neck so if you fall you can get assistance? 

A:  With a little research online or by talking with family or friends, you can find one that will work with you. Recommendation given about Apple watch that asks if you have fallen and sends GPS tracking on where you are at if you don’t answer. 

 

Q:  Is there a booklet or something we can get with a detail view of different exercises we can build on for helping with resistance to falling? 

A:  A physical therapist can help determine a customized exercise program to help you with this. Also, tai chi, like yoga, is a great program to help with significant help on falling, some research showing up to 3 times a week has helped.  Talk to your physical therapist, because we can have different deficiencies because you may be deficient in your quads and hamstrings somebody else may be deficient in their glutes.  You may struggle with lifting your feet up and somebody else will struggle when they start doing head turns so getting a really specific exercise program is probably the best advice, so you’re not wasting your time so you’re not working on exercises you don’t need to work on.

 

Q:  Does Medicare cover balance training? 

A:  Yes, Medicare does cover balance training during a physical therapy appointment.   

Q:  Do you have suggestions on footwear?   

A:  Making sure you are in a footwear that you are comfortable walking in.  Something that isn’t bulky or has a high heel on it or has a big thick sole on it where you can get it caught on cracks in sidewalks.  Flip flops, sandals in the Summer time are going to be hard to justify because they can slip on feet and effect balance.  Specific footwear would be something to talk to your physical therapist to get headed in the right direction.   

 

Q:  Height of chair seat for a sit to stand desk? 

A:  There is a standard height, generally the measurement is dependent on height of the person using the desk. A physical therapist can help you determine the ideal  measurements best suited for your positioning needs.   

 

Q:  Balance with a new hearing aid?  

A:  Vestibular system is a big part of our balance system that contributes to balance and having a new hearing aid can throw of your balance because things are different for you.  

 

excel_faviconJackie Oliver, DPT, OCS completed her Doctorate in Physical Therapy at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, Utah, one of the top Physical Therapy schools in the nation. She was fortunate enough to complete her clinical rotations and begin her physical therapy career within the University of Utah system, which is consistently ranked near the top in healthcare. Exposed to a wide variety of orthopedic conditions, Jackie is confident when assessing and treating a broad range of orthopedic impairments. Jackie is a certified dry needling provider with advanced training from Evidence in Motion and KinetaCore. Jackie achieved the Orthopedic Clinical Specialist advanced certification after extensive advanced training coursework and a stringent examination process from the American Physical Therapy Association.

Jackie has an intense passion for helping and educating others as well as preventative medicine. Because of her college sports background, Jackie loves working with athletes and has experience with biomechanical training and injury prevention in sports. She is also trained as a Diabetes Lifestyle Coach and has worked for the University of Utah and CDC helping individuals decrease their risk of developing diabetes.

Prior to completing her Doctorate in Physical Therapy, Jackie played basketball for Carroll College in Helena, Montana, while also obtaining a Bachelor of Arts degree in Health Science. Jackie was Academic All-American her last two years at Carroll.

 

 

Complimentary Student Athlete Injury Consultations for ALL Manhattan High School, Manhattan Christian High School and Three Forks H.S. Student Athletes

By Tiffany Coletta
tiffany@excelptmt.com

Free Student Athlete Injury Consultations

for ALL Manhattan High School, Manhattan Christian High School and Three Forks High School student athletes 

One-on-one session with Jackie Oliver, DPT, OCSMegan Kemp, DPT, ATC, CSCS or Lisa Palomaki, DPT in your local Excel Physical Therapy Manhattan, Montana clinic.  

Complimentary injury consultation sessions will help determine the best injury treatment options & plan to help return the injured student athlete back to the game healthy & strong.

Includes: 

  • Thorough history of athlete and review of injury  

  • Injury screen looking at strength, mobility, stability and impairments  

  • Education for athlete and parent/guardian on nature of symptoms and best course of treatment (PT, referral to MD, home rehabilitation program)

Call 406-284-4262 to schedule your complimentary student athlete injury consultation.

Learn more about us at https://bit.ly/3jDl0K0

#supportlocal  #communitysupport  #weloveathletes

 

 

Jackie Oliver, DPT, OCS

Megan Kemp, DPT, ATC, CSCS

Lisa Palomaki, DPT

 
 

Managing Headaches & Neck Pain Zoom Talk with Matt Schumacher, DPT, OCS, MTC, CSCS

By Matt Schumacher, DPT, MTC, CAFS, CSCS
matts@excelptmt.com

Managing Headaches & Neck Pain Talk
 
Presented by Matt Schumacher, DPT, OCS, MTC, LIVE on Zoom
Community Virtual Event – Free & open to the public
 
Zoom recording link: https://bit.ly/3kuTm22 
 
Learn about the latest evidence-based practices for optimal headache and neck pain management along with preventive self-care exercises & techniques.
 
  • Understand how physical therapy can be of benefit to you with the goal of assisting in overall reduction of neck pain and headaches
  • Learn about self-management strategies for reducing intensity and frequency of headaches
  • Increase knowledge in the area of neck pain and headaches and their association to one another
Matt’s Managing Headaches & Neck Pain Talk Facebook Event page

 

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Matt Schumacher, DPT, OCS, MTC, CSCS received his Doctorate in Physical Therapy from the University of Mary in Bismarck, ND where he was recognized as a nominee for Outstanding Student Award in his physical therapy class demonstrating excellence in academics, volunteering, and servant leadership.

Matt is a Fellow-in-Training with Bellin College in collaboration with Evidence in Motion (EIM). The Orthopedic Manual Physical Therapy Fellowship program is a 3-5-year post-doctoral program that assists physical therapists in gaining the highest level of skill in manual therapy techniques, educating students and PTs, exhibiting sound clinical reasoning skills for optimal outcomes, and conducting clinic-based research.
 

Matt passed an exam from the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) with the designation of a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS), providing advanced knowledge and experience with designing and implementing safe and effective strength training and conditioning programs. Matt completed a rigorous year-long program with Evidence in Motion (EIM) achieving his Manual Therapy Certification (MTC) gaining advanced training in mobilization and manipulation techniques for common diagnoses of the spine and extremities. Matt achieved the Orthopedic Clinical Specialist (OCS) advanced certification after extensive advanced training coursework and a stringent examination process from the American Physical Therapy Association.

Matt specializes in assisting individuals following post-operative rehabilitation, sports medicine rehabilitation, and orthopedic injuries/ailments of the spine and extremities utilizing advanced knowledge and skill with manual therapy and appropriate exercise prescription. One of his main interests includes the concept of “regional interdependence” where dysfunction in distant regions, both extremity and spine, may contribute to a patient’s primary complaint common in more complex situations. Matt is passionate to utilize this concept with the most evidence-based practices and techniques for optimal outcomes.

Matt enjoys outdoor activities and all that Montana has to offer including hiking, backpacking, wakeboarding, paddle boarding, and various sports with his wife and dog. Matt also has a passion for volunteering, where he recently led twenty-one physical therapy students with his wife on a two-week service project in Guatemala providing rehabilitation services to the surrounding communities.

 

Treating Chronic Pain by Megan Kemp, DPT, ATC, CSCS

By Megan Kemp
megank@excelptmt.com

 

Are you currently living in pain? Have you in the past? If so, you are not alone. 50 million American adults have chronic pain and chronic low back pain is the leading cause of work limitations in the United States. It is generally well known that physical therapy is used following surgery or an injury. Unfortunately, it is much less commonly known that physical therapy is an effective and successful option for treating chronic pain.  

Typically, when people are in pain their first thought is to stop moving. This is often magnified when an individual has been in pain for months, or even years. So, if movement hurts, how can you reduce pain by moving? In order to understand this, it is important to first outline some important principles.  

Our bones and soft tissue structures operate under two important laws: Wolfe’s law and the SAID (Specific Adaptations to Imposed Demands) principle. These laws both imply that our body will adapt to the specific loads you place on it. If you overload the structures, you will have pain. However, if you optimally load the structures (e.g. bone, muscle, tendons), they will improve in strength. By improving your body’s strength, you will in turn be able to move with less pain.  

Physical Therapists are also the experts on identifying faulty movement patterns. Everyone has specific ways they move to accomplish basic daily tasks – walking, getting up from a chair, etc. Unfortunately, our movement patterns are not always optimal. This may be due to muscle imbalances, poor motor control of stabilizing muscle groups or pain. By optimizing your body mechanics, you will be able to reduce microtrauma on certain structures and in turn reduce your pain.  

The physical therapists at Excel Physical Therapy are highly trained in manual therapy techniques. For certain types of pain, a hands-on approach of soft tissue massage and joint mobilization and/or manipulation is indicated to reduce your pain.  

Regardless of the type of pain you may have, we take on an active role in helping you achieve your goals in reducing your pain. Our goal is always to empower every patient that walks in our clinic and help them achieve their goals of pain-free living. We provide a specialized approach to physical therapy that provides the most effective treatments, allowing our patients to return to their highest level of function as quickly as possible.

We have been proudly serving the Gallatin Valley in both Bozeman and Manhattan since 2001. Call us today to schedule an appointment so we can help you too.

 

excel_faviconMegan Kemp, DPT, ATC, CSCS is a Physical Therapist, Certified Athletic Trainer, and a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist in our Manhattan clinic. She’s a Gallatin Valley native and graduate of Manhattan Christian High School and received her Doctorate in Physical Therapy from the University of Montana. She graduated with her Bachelor’s degree in Athletic Training from Point Loma Nazarene University in San Diego, California and is a board-certified athletic trainer through the National Athletic Trainer’s Association. Megan also completed training from the National Strength and Conditioning Association and is a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist. She has served as an adjunct faculty member at Point Loma Nazarene University in their Masters of Kinesiology program. Prior to obtaining her Doctor of Physical Therapy degree, Megan worked as an athletic trainer at Point Loma Nazarene University.

Megan specializes in the treatment of upper and lower extremity athletic injuries, with clinical experience treating both high school and collegiate athletes. Megan is passionate about helping athletes of all ages return to their desired activity and strives to use the most current evidence-based practice medicine coupled with her knowledge of biomechanics to help her patients reach their goals. 

Physical Therapy as a Means for Prevention 

By Matt Schumacher, DPT, MTC, CAFS, CSCS
matts@excelptmt.com

What do you think of when you hear physical therapy? Most individuals may have experienced or know of someone who experienced physical therapy with a past injury or surgery. This is the bread and butter of what we do as physical therapists through rehabilitating individuals back to what they love to do; however, most people do not know the benefits of seeing a physical therapist for “prehabilitation” or wellness checkups prior to a possible or potential injury from occurring.  

Just as one goes to the dentist for a biannual checkup for prevention of possible future dental issues, physical therapy has and can be an option for the public in addressing possible musculoskeletal impairments, muscle strength deficits, and range of motion deficits in the body. As most of us all know, exercise has been suggested to aid in multiple health benefits such as preventing chronic disease, boosting mental health, increasing overall longevity, reducing risk of cardiovascular disease, and improving bone health –  just to name a few. As orthopedic physical therapists, we are trained and knowledgeable in rehabilitation and appropriate exercise prescription following injury and/or surgery, but we are also trained in injury prevention by providing patients and clients resources for reducing their chance of an injury. 

As spring is approaching and we are gearing up for the beautiful Montana summer, physical therapy may be of benefit to you or someone you know to increase your chances of a healthy, active, and injury-free year. It is typically easier to address these possible impairments before an injury may emerge versus after an injury has occurred. Most everyone, including you, may benefit from a “biannual checkup” with physical therapy! 

 

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Matt Schumacher, DPT, MTC, CAFS, CSCS received his Doctorate in Physical Therapy from the University of Mary in Bismarck, ND where he was recognized as a nominee for Outstanding Student Award in his physical therapy class demonstrating excellence in academics, volunteering, and servant leadership. Following graduation, he received training from Gray Institute with a Certification in Applied Functional Science (CAFS). Matt also completed a rigorous year-long program with Evidence in Motion (EIM) achieving his Manual Therapy Certification (MTC) gaining advanced training in mobilization and manipulation techniques for common diagnoses of the spine and extremities. Matt specializes in assisting individuals following post-operative rehabilitation, sports medicine rehabilitation, and orthopedic injuries/ailments of the spine and extremities utilizing advanced knowledge and skill with manual therapy and appropriate exercise prescription. 

Your Chronic Low Back Pain Could Be Instability of the Spine Lurking in the Shadows

By David Coletta, MPT, CMPT
david@excelptmt.com

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While 80% of all US citizens will experience some level of low back pain during their lives, 10.2% (2006 US Survey) of all adults in this country have suffered from chronic low back pain that limits activity for an extended period of time.  As a physical therapist that specializes in treating the spine, I often have chronic low back pain patients that struggle to understand why their condition exists.  Many clients arrive for an evaluation after years with severe bouts of low back pain that comes and goes with minimal cause or explanation.  Trips to the doctor for medication, days missed from work, and visits to various types of practitioners are common with this diagnosis. My experience has found that some of these chronic low back pain patients have spinal instability as the source of their condition. 

Spinal instability or excessive vertebral segmental motion is a possible cause of chronic low back pain.  General wear and tear, previous injuries, and congenital abnormality of the vertebrae can be factors that lead towards instability.  Looking at the spine with the muscles removed, there is a beautiful structure that is present which allows for movement, but also provides stability from one spinal segment in relation to its neighbor (above or below).  The discs, ligaments, and vertebrae themselves provide this passive stability.  Compromise to these structures can lead to instability or an excessive amount of movement.  The muscles of core and deep spine provide protection and smooth movement between the vertebrae and the low back in general, which is termed dynamic stability. When passive stability is lacking, dynamic stability is in greater need.  However, dynamic muscular stability of this level is often lacking in spinal instability patients.  With these individuals, acute low back pain bouts arise when an activity, such as shoveling snow or even bending over to pick up a pencil from the ground, overloads the available passive and dynamic stability.

Perhaps the most common form of low back instability is an anterior spondylolisthesis or a slippage forward of a lumbar vertebra in relation to the vertebra below it.  This diagnosis can be picked up through a detailed and specific physical therapy evaluation and then confirmed with a specialized x-ray of the lumbar spine.  A spondylolisthesis has various grades, depending on the degree of slippage measured on the image. A mild or even moderate spondylolisthesis is best treated with specific core stabilization exercises and teaching the patient how to safely lift, given this diagnosis.  Higher grades of spondylolisthesis may require surgical spinal fusion to stabilize the segments. Many patients go years or decades without understanding the true source of their chronic low back pain.  In some cases, instability or spondylolisthesis is the culprit lurking in the shadows.

 

As the founding owner of Excel Physical Therapy, David Coletta, MPT, CMPT strives for our clinics to deliver unprecedented excellence with patient care in the Gallatin Valley. David established Excel PT in 2001 on the principles of specialization, advanced education and customer service. David specializes in the treatment of back and neck pain, spinal issues, whiplash, headaches, TMJ/jaw pain, and postural dysfunctions. 

A considerable amount of David’s advanced training occurred through the North American Institute of Orthopedic Manual Therapy (NAIOMT). He has completed advanced certification in manual therapy (CMPT) with NAIOMT, and he has received advanced training in dry needling techniques for the spine and extremities. David is a Certified Clinical BikeFit Pro Fitter.

Conquering Low Back Pain Seminar 10/17/2018 @ Nogan's Cafe in Manhattan

By Jackie Oliver, DPT
jackie@excelptmt.com

Community Education Series | Free & Open to the Public

“Conquering Low Back Pain

presented by Jackie, Oliver, DPT

Wednesday, October 17, 2018 | 6:00-7:00pm

Nogan’s Cafe – 220 Wooden Shoe Lane in Manhattan

  • Understand anatomic sources of low back pain.
  • How a physical therapist uses specialized techniques to help alleviate low back pain.
  • Learn proven exercises to help low back pain symptoms.
  • Q&A with Jackie after the talk. Please bring your questions.

Back pain is the most common complaint U.S. healthcare professionals receive daily. Come hear Jackie Oliver, DPT of Excel Physical Therapy discuss back pain and how you can find the pain relief you seek.

Jackie Oliver, DPT completed her Doctorate in Physical Therapy at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, Utah, one of the top Physical Therapy schools in the nation. Jackie is a certified dry needling provider with advanced training from Evidence in Motion and KinetaCore.Jackie has an intense passion for helping and educating others as well as preventative medicine. Because of her college sports background, Jackie loves working with athletes and has experience with biomechanical training and injury prevention in sports. She is also trained as a Diabetes Lifestyle Coach and has worked for the University of Utah and CDC helping individuals decrease their risk of developing diabetes.Prior to completing her Doctorate in Physical Therapy, Jackie played basketball for Carroll College in Helena, Montana, while also obtaining a Bachelor of Arts degree in Health Science. Jackie was Academic All-American her last two years at Carroll.

"Great friendly team. Clean office. Keep it going!" -- K.N., Bozeman Patient

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